Visual communication in mapping the life and afterlife of Nicholaus Maniacutius

This project is a faculty-student research collaboration with Dr. Marie-Therese Champagne and mentored by Prof. Thomas Asmuth. The faculty-student group consists of multidisciplinary students from the Kugelman Honors Program and faculty stemming from the College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities. Respectfully with Prof. Thomas Asmuth from the art department and Dr. Marie-Thérèse Champagne from the history department. The project's research director and author. The students include Rayne Henry, Lucas Alderfer and Isabella Cameron.
The research is a component of Champagne's research of the text, Ad incorrupta pontificum nomina conservanda by Nicolaus Maniacutius, a 12th-century Cistercian scholar from Rome. The text is devoted to preserving the 'proper' naming and lineage of Catholic popes. Ad incorrupta is an important work by Maniacutius; in other writings, he condemns the brutalization of texts and history by faulty scribal transcriptions. Champagne has painstakingly spent years locating surviving copies of Ad incorrupta revealing that the manuscript is located in multiple sites across Europe. The text was reproduced by hand for many institutions in the later Middle Ages, indicating the significance and popularity of the subject.
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Abstract/Description: This project is a faculty-student research collaboration with Dr. Marie-Therese Champagne and mentored by Prof. Thomas Asmuth. The faculty-student group consists of multidisciplinary students from the Kugelman Honors Program and faculty stemming from the College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities. Respectfully with Prof. Thomas Asmuth from the art department and Dr. Marie-Thérèse Champagne from the history department. The project's research director and author. The students include Rayne Henry, Lucas Alderfer and Isabella Cameron. The research is a component of Champagne's research of the text, Ad incorrupta pontificum nomina conservanda by Nicolaus Maniacutius, a 12th-century Cistercian scholar from Rome. The text is devoted to preserving the 'proper' naming and lineage of Catholic popes. Ad incorrupta is an important work by Maniacutius; in other writings, he condemns the brutalization of texts and history by faulty scribal transcriptions. Champagne has painstakingly spent years locating surviving copies of Ad incorrupta revealing that the manuscript is located in multiple sites across Europe. The text was reproduced by hand for many institutions in the later Middle Ages, indicating the significance and popularity of the subject.
Subject(s): Nicolaus Maniacutius
Undergraduate Research
Ad incorrupta pontificum nomina conservanda