Reconstructed slavery

Coming out of the Civil War, close to four million African Americans finally got the taste of freedom. The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned lands, commonly known as the  Freedmen's Bureau was created to help with the transition from slavery to freedom. While the Bureau succeeded in many ways, it failed when it came to employment and economic  freedom. Through the use and enforcement of labor contracts, the Freedman's Bureau not only stripped newly freed African Americans of their economic and mobile freedom but also helped lay the foundation for developing and progressing the systemic and institutional racism towards the African American community that still exists today.
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Abstract/Description: Coming out of the Civil War, close to four million African Americans finally got the taste of freedom. The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned lands, commonly known as the Freedmen's Bureau was created to help with the transition from slavery to freedom. While the Bureau succeeded in many ways, it failed when it came to employment and economic freedom. Through the use and enforcement of labor contracts, the Freedman's Bureau not only stripped newly freed African Americans of their economic and mobile freedom but also helped lay the foundation for developing and progressing the systemic and institutional racism towards the African American community that still exists today.
Subject(s): systemic racism in the South
Undergraduate Research
Freedmen's Bureau