Should college athletes receive compensation?

The Supreme Court is currently set to provide a ruling on Alston v. NCAA later this year. If the Supreme Court rules against the NCAA, then member institutions will no longer be able to limit the non-cash benefits provided to athletes. This decision has the potential to invoke several new lawsuits against a weakened NCAA, possibly leading to an inevitable case challenging the 
NCAA's ability to deny its athletes the right to monetary compensation.
Recently, the State of California passed the Fair Pay to Play Act, allowing college athletes to enter third-party contracts to benefit from their names, images, and likenesses. Prompted by this act and pressure from other states, the NCAA voted to allow college athletes to receive compensation from third parties for their names, images, and likenesses based on rules set by
individual conferences. Also, the NCAA revealed that college athletes could receive compensation from third parties if the compensation contracts still promoted "amateurism."
The question now stands of whether colleges should compensate their athletes directly based on their revenues generated. The purpose of this research is attempted to examine the potential impact of a Supreme Court decision, if college athletes were to be compensated monetarily, on the sports industry by analyzing the legal aspects, economic factors, and public opinions about this issue based on the literature available to be reviewed.
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Abstract/Description: The Supreme Court is currently set to provide a ruling on Alston v. NCAA later this year. If the Supreme Court rules against the NCAA, then member institutions will no longer be able to limit the non-cash benefits provided to athletes. This decision has the potential to invoke several new lawsuits against a weakened NCAA, possibly leading to an inevitable case challenging the NCAA's ability to deny its athletes the right to monetary compensation. Recently, the State of California passed the Fair Pay to Play Act, allowing college athletes to enter third-party contracts to benefit from their names, images, and likenesses. Prompted by this act and pressure from other states, the NCAA voted to allow college athletes to receive compensation from third parties for their names, images, and likenesses based on rules set by individual conferences. Also, the NCAA revealed that college athletes could receive compensation from third parties if the compensation contracts still promoted "amateurism." The question now stands of whether colleges should compensate their athletes directly based on their revenues generated. The purpose of this research is attempted to examine the potential impact of a Supreme Court decision, if college athletes were to be compensated monetarily, on the sports industry by analyzing the legal aspects, economic factors, and public opinions about this issue based on the literature available to be reviewed.
Subject(s): Impact Analysis
Undergraduate Research
College Athletes
Compensation
Collegiate Sports