Seasick

Sailing and the maritime wood have evolved exponentially since the inception of the ship. In the Middle Ages, ships sailed the ocean, discovered new lands far away, traded and sped up
commerce, and even helped fight wars. Today, technology allows people to do all these things on a much grander scale without using a single sail. Despite the evolution or sailing and maritime capabilities, one necessity has never changed, and it is one of the most critical parts of sailing. That is the health and wellness of crews. Like today, the sea posed many threats to seamen and passengers in the Middle Ages. The risk or bodily injury was already high in a physically demanding job such as sailing. Pirates and privateers were a constant threat to ocean travelers. On voyages such as those led by Magellan and De Gama, the chances of being attacked or killed by indigenous peoples were great. Magellan himself discovered this the hard way.
In addition to the endless possibilities of physical Injury, there was also the looming prospect or diseases that could ravage a ship. Contact with new places introduced illnesses to a population and crew with catastrophic results. Improper nutrition and hygiene while out at sea were also catalysts for other diseases such as scurvy and dysentery. With these maladies, sailors and crews still had ways to survive and sail on.
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Abstract/Description: Sailing and the maritime wood have evolved exponentially since the inception of the ship. In the Middle Ages, ships sailed the ocean, discovered new lands far away, traded and sped up commerce, and even helped fight wars. Today, technology allows people to do all these things on a much grander scale without using a single sail. Despite the evolution or sailing and maritime capabilities, one necessity has never changed, and it is one of the most critical parts of sailing. That is the health and wellness of crews. Like today, the sea posed many threats to seamen and passengers in the Middle Ages. The risk or bodily injury was already high in a physically demanding job such as sailing. Pirates and privateers were a constant threat to ocean travelers. On voyages such as those led by Magellan and De Gama, the chances of being attacked or killed by indigenous peoples were great. Magellan himself discovered this the hard way. In addition to the endless possibilities of physical Injury, there was also the looming prospect or diseases that could ravage a ship. Contact with new places introduced illnesses to a population and crew with catastrophic results. Improper nutrition and hygiene while out at sea were also catalysts for other diseases such as scurvy and dysentery. With these maladies, sailors and crews still had ways to survive and sail on.
Subject(s): Maritime history
Undergraduate Research
Middle Ages
Health and wellness