Creating the American materpiece

Early nineteenth-century America saw Andrew Jackson's political activity rally supporters all over America in support of white supremacy and westward expansion. Based on such ideas, Americans believed at the time that they contributed to a greater good: God's divine will to spread white Christian civilization from the Atlantic Coast to the Pacific. While Jacksonianism spread, so did the push for moral reform led by movements such as The Great Awakening and a widespread belief that Jesus Christ was returning any day. People were preparing
themselves spiritually to 90 up with Jesus into heaven In those last days of judgment. Both of these ideological directions Americans took led to a culture of philanthropy, benevolence, and paternalism. From this culture came a sense of duty to help ·those less fortunate." American citizens paid more attention to the issues of the disabled, and solutions were sought. People like Dorothea Dix led movements to improve opportunities and living conditions for people with mental illnesses. Asylums built In all different parts of the country gave hopes for cures and improvements for this group of people. The early nineteenth century saw much change in the medical and social treatment of the mentally and physically disabled.
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Abstract/Description: Early nineteenth-century America saw Andrew Jackson's political activity rally supporters all over America in support of white supremacy and westward expansion. Based on such ideas, Americans believed at the time that they contributed to a greater good: God's divine will to spread white Christian civilization from the Atlantic Coast to the Pacific. While Jacksonianism spread, so did the push for moral reform led by movements such as The Great Awakening and a widespread belief that Jesus Christ was returning any day. People were preparing themselves spiritually to 90 up with Jesus into heaven In those last days of judgment. Both of these ideological directions Americans took led to a culture of philanthropy, benevolence, and paternalism. From this culture came a sense of duty to help ·those less fortunate." American citizens paid more attention to the issues of the disabled, and solutions were sought. People like Dorothea Dix led movements to improve opportunities and living conditions for people with mental illnesses. Asylums built In all different parts of the country gave hopes for cures and improvements for this group of people. The early nineteenth century saw much change in the medical and social treatment of the mentally and physically disabled.
Subject(s): Undergraduate Research
Physical and mental abnormalities
Early nineteenth century
America