OUR Works and Recycled 3D printing filament

30 printing is an ever-growing field that is slowly and surely permeating every aspect of the engineering field. It is a unique tool that can create prototypes cheaper and quicker than traditional methods. SEA 3D is an arm of the HAAS Center that caters to the local business and student needs to assist in rapid prototyping and provides niche parts made from carbon reinforced nylon. 3D printing is a process called additive manufacturing which is a process that uses computer numerical control (CNC) to move a tool head that melts materials to its glass transition point and build an object layer by layer. This process creates waste material as it requires supports to give strength to layers which form sharp overhanging surfaces. There is also waste from material used to adhere the print to the bed, or if the print fails. SEA 3D creates enough waste in the form of commercially abundant polylactide (PLA) that a proposal was  approved to buy a pair of machines that would allow the lab to re-use the waste material. During the Fall of 2020, a capstone and enterprise team was created to investigate and refine a process that would tum number one recyclable plastics (polyethylene terephthalate, PET) into usable filament. Through hours of hard work, the team successfully created printable filament from recycled water bottles.
My involvement In the project, started In fall of 2020 when I was able to become involved with OUR through the OUR Works Program and assigned onto the& project to assist the enterprise
team that was working on the project. Working with Murillo Basso and the enterprise and capstone team, I was able to expand my work from the study of the recycling process to get hands on experience printing with several different machines and studying the mechanical properties of printed test objects. The goal of this portion of the project seeks lo determine the Modulus of Elasticity and Tensile Strength of 3D printed Dog bones using PLA. ABS, and PETG samples as they are three of the most common materials.
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Abstract/Description: 30 printing is an ever-growing field that is slowly and surely permeating every aspect of the engineering field. It is a unique tool that can create prototypes cheaper and quicker than traditional methods. SEA 3D is an arm of the HAAS Center that caters to the local business and student needs to assist in rapid prototyping and provides niche parts made from carbon reinforced nylon. 3D printing is a process called additive manufacturing which is a process that uses computer numerical control (CNC) to move a tool head that melts materials to its glass transition point and build an object layer by layer. This process creates waste material as it requires supports to give strength to layers which form sharp overhanging surfaces. There is also waste from material used to adhere the print to the bed, or if the print fails. SEA 3D creates enough waste in the form of commercially abundant polylactide (PLA) that a proposal was approved to buy a pair of machines that would allow the lab to re-use the waste material. During the Fall of 2020, a capstone and enterprise team was created to investigate and refine a process that would tum number one recyclable plastics (polyethylene terephthalate, PET) into usable filament. Through hours of hard work, the team successfully created printable filament from recycled water bottles. My involvement In the project, started In fall of 2020 when I was able to become involved with OUR through the OUR Works Program and assigned onto the& project to assist the enterprise team that was working on the project. Working with Murillo Basso and the enterprise and capstone team, I was able to expand my work from the study of the recycling process to get hands on experience printing with several different machines and studying the mechanical properties of printed test objects. The goal of this portion of the project seeks lo determine the Modulus of Elasticity and Tensile Strength of 3D printed Dog bones using PLA. ABS, and PETG samples as they are three of the most common materials.
Subject(s): Undergraduate Research
3D printing
SEA 3D
Haas Center, UWF
3D recycling