The 1875 Pensacola lynchings and the "Right Way" to protest racial injustice

In August 1875, two Black men suspected of raping a white woman In Escambia County, Florida were pulled from their jail cell in the middle of the night and hanged near Pensacola's Seville Square. The 100-person mob then riddled their bodies with bullets. In the following days, racial tensions nearly boiled over as a local black militia was met by armed white residents called into service by Pensacola's mayor, a former Confederate colonel. This event was the first recorded lynching in Pensacola and presaged the campaign of terror and disenfranchisement that would be waged against Black residents in subsequent decades.
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Abstract/Description: In August 1875, two Black men suspected of raping a white woman In Escambia County, Florida were pulled from their jail cell in the middle of the night and hanged near Pensacola's Seville Square. The 100-person mob then riddled their bodies with bullets. In the following days, racial tensions nearly boiled over as a local black militia was met by armed white residents called into service by Pensacola's mayor, a former Confederate colonel. This event was the first recorded lynching in Pensacola and presaged the campaign of terror and disenfranchisement that would be waged against Black residents in subsequent decades.
Subject(s): Protesting racial inequality in America
Undergraduate Research
Pensacola, Florida
Lynchings