Visually communicating the life and afterlife of Nicolaus Maniacutius through the medieval reproduction of his text, Ad incorrup

This research project originated as a  faculty-student research collaboration with Dr. Marie--Thèrése Champagne. The research is a component of Champagne's book project, tracing the circulation of one text throughout Europe over about 150 years in the High Middle Ages. The text, Ad incorrupta pontificium nomina conservanda, was written by Nichlaus Maniacutius, a 12th century Cistercian scholar from Rome. The text is devoted to preserving the 'proper' naming and lineage of the Catholic popes. Dr. Champagne has spent years locating surviving copies of Ad incorrupta, revealing that the manuscripts are multiple sites across Europe.
Last spring, a small group and I began this project, attempting to reflect the, then sixteen, now twenty versions of Maniacutius's text through legend symbols and an accurate contour map of Europe to be used on an ArcGIS story map.
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Abstract/Description: This research project originated as a faculty-student research collaboration with Dr. Marie--Thèrése Champagne. The research is a component of Champagne's book project, tracing the circulation of one text throughout Europe over about 150 years in the High Middle Ages. The text, Ad incorrupta pontificium nomina conservanda, was written by Nichlaus Maniacutius, a 12th century Cistercian scholar from Rome. The text is devoted to preserving the 'proper' naming and lineage of the Catholic popes. Dr. Champagne has spent years locating surviving copies of Ad incorrupta, revealing that the manuscripts are multiple sites across Europe. Last spring, a small group and I began this project, attempting to reflect the, then sixteen, now twenty versions of Maniacutius's text through legend symbols and an accurate contour map of Europe to be used on an ArcGIS story map.
Subject(s): Ad incorrupta pontificum nomina conservanda
Undergraduate Research
Nicolaus Maniacutius
Date Issued: 2021